Natural Resources

Landslides

Date: 1838

Location: Harbour Grace

Latitude: 47° 41' 08" N

Longitude: 53° 13' 42" W

Fatalities: 0

Injuries: 0

Source: Juke's Excursions

"Excursions In and About Newfoundland During the Years 1839 and 1840"

Joseph Beete Jukes

Chapter I

"June 17th. It was quite calm during the night, but at six AM a breeze sprung up from the southwest, against which we beat up for Portugal Cove. As we neared Bell Island we saw a fleet of fishing-vessels rounding it and anchoring under its lee, and presently a smart squall of wind and rain struck us, against which we made but little headway. After trying for some time in vain to get near enough to Bell Island to anchor, we bore up for Harbour Grace. The packet-boat put out of Harbour Grace as we went in, but after a little while she too ran back to the shelter of the harbour.

In the afternoon I visited a land-slip, in company with Mr. St. John. In June, 1838, near a place called the Grove, on the north side of the harbour, after a great flood of rain, a large piece of the cliff, consisting chiefly of rubbish and boulders, slid forward over the smooth slate rock, which in that place dips towards the water. The subsidence was about 100 yards long, 40 yards across, and the cliff about 140 feet high. It consisted now of three ridges or shelves of land on which the trees stood undisturbed, with broken ground between them. These shelf-strips rose one above another, the uppermost having subsided about fifteen feet, with a chasm thirty feet wide between it and the main land. "

 
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